netrate 1.1

netrate is a text-mode Perl script which provides data rates that are going across the network interfaces on your machine.
netrate is a text-mode Perl script which provides data rate (kbits|bytes/sec and packets/sec) that are going across the network interfaces on your machine. Also provides a mode which displays the peak traffic.

About Perl:

Perl is a dynamic programming language created by Larry Wall and first released in 1987. Perl borrows features from a variety of other languages including C, shell scripting (sh), AWK, sed and Lisp. Perl was widely adopted for its strengths in text processing and lack of the arbitrary limitations of many scripting languages at the time.

Larry Wall began work on Perl in 1987, while working as a programmer at Unisys, and released version 1.0 to the comp.sources.misc newsgroup on December 18, 1987. The language expanded rapidly over the next few years. Perl 2, released in 1988, featured a better regular expression engine. Perl 3, released in 1989, added support for binary data streams.

Until 1991, the only documentation for Perl was a single (increasingly lengthy) man page. In 1991, Programming perl (known to many Perl programmers as the "Camel Book") was published, and became the de facto reference for the language. At the same time, the Perl version number was bumped to 4, not to mark a major change in the language, but to identify the version that was documented by the book.

Perl 4 went through a series of maintenance releases, culminating in Perl 4.036 in 1993. At that point, Larry Wall abandoned Perl 4 to begin work on Perl 5.

Initial design of Perl 5 continued into 1994. The perl5-porters mailing list was established in May 1994 to coordinate work on porting Perl 5 to different platforms. It remains the primary forum for development, maintenance, and porting of Perl 5.

Perl 5 was released on October 17, 1994. It was a nearly complete rewrite of the interpreter, and added many new features to the language, including objects, references, lexical (my) variables, and modules. Importantly, modules provided a mechanism for extending the language without modifying the interpreter. This allowed the core interpreter to stabilize, even as it enabled ordinary Perl programmers to add new language features.

As of 2007, Perl 5 is still being actively maintained. Important features and some essential new language constructs have been added along the way, including Unicode support, threads, improved support for object oriented programming and many other enhancements.

On December 18, 2007, the 20th anniversary of Perl 1.0, Perl 5.10.0 was released. Perl 5.10.0 includes notable new features, which bring it closer to Perl 6, among them a new switch statement (called "given/when"), regular expressions updates, the "smart match operator" ~~, and more.

One of the most important events in Perl 5 history took place outside of the language proper, and was a consequence of its module support. On October 26, 1995, the Comprehensive Perl Archive Network (CPAN) was established as a repository for Perl modules and Perl itself. At the time of writing, it carries over 11,000 modules by over 5,000 authors. CPAN is widely regarded as one of the greatest strengths of Perl in practice.

last updated on:
April 16th, 2008, 10:38 GMT
price:
FREE!
developed by:
David Calkins
homepage:
sourceforge.net
license type:
GPL (GNU General Public License) 
category:
ROOT \ System \ Networking

FREE!

In a hurry? Add it to your Download Basket!

user rating 12

3.8/5
 

0/5

Rate it!
2 Screenshots
netratenetrate

Add your review!

SUBMIT