Linux NFS Utilities 1.2.6

Linux NFS Utilities is NFS utilities for Linux NFS clients and servers.
Linux NFS Utilities are NFS utilities for Linux NFS clients and servers.

Here are some key features of "Linux NFS Utilities":

NFS Versions 2, 3, and 4 are supported on 2.6 and later kernels.
NFS over UDP and TCP on IPv4 are supported on the latest 2.4 and 2.6 kernels.
Linux NFS clients and servers have been tested against many non-Linux implementations.
Since version 1.0.1 of the NFS utilities tarball has changed the server export default to "sync", then, if no behavior is specified in the export list (thus assuming the default behavior), a warning will be generated at export time.
If you plan to deploy NFS extensively, consider subscribing to one of these mailing lists: NFS Mailing List, or the AutoFS Mailing List. Before reporting problems, you should search for similar issues in the searchable mail archive. Another searchable archive for NFS, supported by Google, is here. The searchable mail archive for AutoFS is here.
A useful set of generic NFS references includes the following:
- "NFS Illustrated," by Brent Callaghan; Addison-Wesley, 2000.
- "Managing NFS and NIS, 2nd edition," by Hal Stern, Mike Eisler, Ricardo Labiaga; O'Reilly, 2001.
- "Linux NFS and Automounter Administration," by Erez Zadok; Sybex, 2001.
- "Using the Linux NFS Client with Network Appliance Filers," by Charles Lever; Netapp TR-3183, 2004.
- "Mike Eisler's NFS blog."
- "Eric Kustarz's blog."
- "NFS version 4 home page."
- Finally, the "linux.org online library" has many references.

Quick setup client guide

1. Acquire and install a recent distribution of Linux.
2. Set up your /etc/exports file (man exports for details).
3. Consult your distribution's documentation to determine which /etc/init.d start-up script is used to start your server. Start NFS services by invoking this script as root, using the "start" parameter. Consider adding this script to the list of scripts that are automatically run at system start-up. (Red Hat uses the chkconfig command for this purpose).
4. Read the NFS How-To for advice on tuning and securing your server.

Quick Client Setup Guide

1. Acquire and install a recent distribution of Linux. To enable NLM lock recovery, ensure your client's host name, as returned by uname -n, matches the host name returned by DNS.
2. The NLM protocol is handled by an in-kernel service in modern kernels, but the user-level rpc.statd program must be running to enable NLM lock recovery. Consult your distribution's documentation to determine which /etc/init.d start-up script is used to start it. Start the NSM daemon by invoking this script as root, using the "start" parameter. Consider adding this script to the list of scripts that are automatically run at system start-up. (Red Hat uses the chkconfig command for this purpose).
3. Create the directories on your client where you will mount the NFS shares.
4. Add entries in /etc/fstab corresponding to your mount points (man nfs for details).
5. Use mount -a -t nfs to mount the NFS shares.
6. During system boot-up, most distributions automatically mount NFS shares that are listed in /etc/fstab. If yours doesn't, check your distribution's documentation for instructions on how to configure your client to do this.

What's New in This Release:

A number of bug fixes to the text-based mount code.
Bug fixes to the nfsstat command
Addition of the mountstats python script
Enhancements to the gssd daemon.
IPv6 support which is currently off by default.

last updated on:
May 22nd, 2012, 13:19 GMT
price:
FREE!
homepage:
nfs.sourceforge.net
license type:
GPL (GNU General Public License) 
developed by:
Linux NFS Developers
category:
ROOT \ System \ Clustering and Distributed Networks
Linux NFS Utilities
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