mod_vhost_alias 1.3

mod_vhost_alias Apache module provides support for dynamically configured mass virtual hosting.
mod_vhost_alias is an Apache module that creates dynamically configured virtual hosts, by allowing the IP address and/or the Host: header of the HTTP request to be used as part of the pathname to determine what files to serve. This allows for easy use of a huge number of virtual hosts with similar configurations.

Directory Name Interpolation

All the directives in this module interpolate a string into a pathname. The interpolated string (henceforth called the "name") may be either the server name (see the UseCanonicalName directive for details on how this is determined) or the IP address of the virtual host on the server in dotted-quad format. The interpolation is controlled by specifiers inspired by printf which have a number of formats:

%%

insert a %

%p

insert the port number of the virtual host

%N.M

insert (part of) the name

N and M are used to specify substrings of the name. N selects from the dot-separated components of the name, and M selects characters within whatever N has selected. M is optional and defaults to zero if it isn't present; the dot must be present if and only if M is present. The interpretation is as follows:

0

the whole name

1

the first part

2

the second part

-1

the last part

-2

the penultimate part

2+

the second and all subsequent parts

-2+

the penultimate and all preceding parts

1+ and -1+

the same as 0

If N or M is greater than the number of parts available a single underscore is interpolated.

Examples

For simple name-based virtual hosts you might use the following directives in your server configuration file:

UseCanonicalName Off
VirtualDocumentRoot /usr/local/apache/vhosts/%0

A request for http://www.example.com/directory/file.html will be satisfied by the file /usr/local/apache/vhosts/www.example.com/directory/file.html.
For a very large number of virtual hosts it is a good idea to arrange the files to reduce the size of the vhosts directory. To do this you might use the following in your configuration file:

UseCanonicalName Off
VirtualDocumentRoot /usr/local/apache/vhosts/%3+/%2.1/%2.2/%2.3/%2

A request for http://www.example.isp.com/directory/file.html will be satisfied by the file /usr/local/apache/vhosts/isp.com/e/x/a/example/directory/file.html. A more even spread of files can be achieved by hashing from the end of the name, for example:

VirtualDocumentRoot /usr/local/apache/vhosts/%3+/%2.-1/%2.-2/%2.-3/%2

The example request would come from /usr/local/apache/vhosts/isp.com/e/l/p/example/directory/file.html. Alternatively you might use:

VirtualDocumentRoot /usr/local/apache/vhosts/%3+/%2.1/%2.2/%2.3/%2.4+

The example request would come from /usr/local/apache/vhosts/isp.com/e/x/a/mple/directory/file.html.
For IP-based virtual hosting you might use the following in your configuration file:

UseCanonicalName DNS
VirtualDocumentRootIP /usr/local/apache/vhosts/%1/%2/%3/%4/docs
VirtualScriptAliasIP /usr/local/apache/vhosts/%1/%2/%3/%4/cgi-bin

A request for http://www.example.isp.com/directory/file.html would be satisfied by the file /usr/local/apache/vhosts/10/20/30/40/docs/directory/file.html if the IP address of www.example.com were 10.20.30.40. A request for http://www.example.isp.com/cgi-bin/script.pl would be satisfied by executing the program /usr/local/apache/vhosts/10/20/30/40/cgi-bin/script.pl.
If you want to include the . character in a VirtualDocumentRoot directive, but it clashes with a % directive, you can work around the problem in the following way:

VirtualDocumentRoot /usr/local/apache/vhosts/%2.0.%3.0

A request for http://www.example.isp.com/directory/file.html will be satisfied by the file /usr/local/apache/vhosts/example.isp/directory/file.html.

Requirements:

· Apache 1.3.7 and later

last updated on:
May 5th, 2007, 21:05 GMT
price:
FREE!
developed by:
The Apache project
homepage:
httpd.apache.org
license type:
The Apache License 
category:
ROOT \ Internet \ HTTP (WWW)

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