dupfinder 1.4.3

Find and manage duplication files on the file system
dupfind is a Python utility that allows you to find duplicated files and directories in your file system.

Show how utility find duplicated files:

By default utility identifies duplication files by file content.

First of all - create several different files in the current directory.

 >>> createFile('tfile1.txt', "A"*10)
 >>> createFile('tfile2.txt', "A"*1025)
 >>> createFile('tfile3.txt', "A"*2048)


Then create other files in another directory, one of them to be the same as already created ones.

 >>> mkd("dir1")
 >>> createFile('tfile1.txt', "A"*20, "dir1")
 >>> createFile('tfile2.txt', "A"*1025, "dir1")
 >>> createFile('tfile13.txt', "A"*48, "dir1")


Look into the directories contents:

 >>> ls()
 === list directory ===
 D :: dir1 :: ...
 F :: tfile1.txt :: 10
 F :: tfile2.txt :: 1025
 F :: tfile3.txt :: 2048

 >>> ls("dir1")
 === list dir1 directory ===
 F :: tfile1.txt :: 20
 F :: tfile13.txt :: 48
 F :: tfile2.txt :: 1025


We see, that "tfile2.txt" is same in both directories, while "tfile1.txt" - has the same name, but differs in size. So utility must identify only "tfile2.txt" as a duplication file.

We force output results with "-o " argument to outputf file, and pass testdir as directory that is looking for duplications.

 >>> dupfind("-o %(o)s %(dir)s" % {'o':outputf, 'dir': testdir})

Now check the results file for duplications.

 >>> cat(outputf)
 hash,size,type,ext,name,directory,modification,operation,operation_data
 ...,1025,F,txt,tfile2.txt,.../tmp.../dir1,...
 ...,1025,F,txt,tfile2.txt,.../tmp...,...


Show quick/slow utility mode:

As mentioned above - utility identifies duplication files by file contents. This mode slows down the system and consumes a lot of system resources.

However, in most cases the file name and size is enough to identify the duplication. So in that case you can use quick mode --quick (-q) option.

So test the previous files in the quick mode:

 >>> dupfind("-q -o %(o)s %(dir)s" % {'o':outputf, 'dir': testdir})

Now check the result file for duplications.

 >>> cat(outputf)
 hash,size,type,ext,name,directory,modification,operation,operation_data
 ...,1025,F,txt,tfile2.txt,.../tmp.../dir1,...
 ...,1025,F,txt,tfile2.txt,.../tmp...,...


As we can see the quick mode identifies duplications correctly.

Let's show that there are cases when this mode can lead to mistakes. To do that let's add a file with the same name and size but different content and apply utility in both modes:

 >>> createFile('tfile000.txt', "First "*20,)
 >>> createFile('tfile000.txt', "Second "*20, "dir1")


Now check the duplication results using default (not quick mode) ...

 >>> dupfind(" -o %(o)s %(dir)s" % {'o':outputf, 'dir': testdir})
 >>> cat(outputf)
 hash,size,type,ext,name,directory,modification,operation,operation_data
 ...,1025,F,txt,tfile2.txt,.../tmp.../dir1,...
 ...,1025,F,txt,tfile2.txt,.../tmp...,...


As we can see not-quick mode identifies duplications correctly.

Let's check duplications using the quick mode...

 >>> dupfind(" -q -o %(o)s %(dir)s" % {'o':outputf, 'dir': testdir})
 >>> cat(outputf)
 hash,size,type,ext,name,directory,modification,operation,operation_data
 ...,140,F,txt,tfile000.txt,.../tmp.../dir1,...
 ...,140,F,txt,tfile000.txt,.../tmp...,...
 ...,1025,F,txt,tfile2.txt,.../tmp.../dir1,...
 ...,1025,F,txt,tfile2.txt,.../tmp...,...


As we can see wrong duplications are found using the quick-mode.

Cleanup the test

 >>> cleanTestDir()


Show how utility finds duplicated directories:

Utility identifies duplicated directories as directories, all files of which are duplicated and all inner directories are also duplicated directories.
First compare 2 directories with the same files.

Create directories with the same content.

 >>> def mkDir(dpath):
 ... mkd(dpath)
 ... createFile('tfile1.txt', "A"*10, dpath)
 ... createFile('tfile2.txt', "A"*1025, dpath)
 ... createFile('tfile3.txt', "A"*2048, dpath)
 ...
 >>> mkDir("dir1")
 >>> mkDir("dir2")


Confirm that the directories' contents are really identical

 >>> ls("dir1")
 === list dir1 directory ===
 F :: tfile1.txt :: 10
 F :: tfile2.txt :: 1025
 F :: tfile3.txt :: 2048

 >>> ls("dir2")
 === list dir2 directory ===
 F :: tfile1.txt :: 10
 F :: tfile2.txt :: 1025
 F :: tfile3.txt :: 2048


Now run the utility and check the result file:

 >>> dupfind("-o %(o)s %(dir)s" % {'o':outputf, 'dir': testdir})
 >>> cat(outputf)
 hash,size,type,ext,name,directory,modification,operation,operation_data
 ...,D,,dir1,...
 ...,D,,dir2,...


Compare 2 directories with the same files and dirs.

Create new directories with the same content, but different names in previously created directories.

So for directories to be interpreted as duplications - they don't need to have the same name, but the identical content.

Add 2 identical directories to the previous ones.

 >>> def mkDir1(dpath):
 ... mkd(dpath)
 ... createFile('tfile11.txt', "B"*4000, dpath)
 ... createFile('tfile12.txt', "B"*222, dpath)
 ...
 >>> mkDir1("dir1/dir11")
 >>> mkDir1("dir2/dir21")


Note that we added two directories with same contents, but different names. This should not break duplications.

 >>> def mkDir2(dpath):
 ... mkd(dpath)
 ... createFile('tfile21.txt', "C"*4096, dpath)
 ... createFile('tfile22.txt', "C"*123, dpath)
 ... createFile('tfile23.txt', "C"*444, dpath)
 ... createFile('tfile24.txt', "C"*555, dpath)
 ...
 >>> mkDir2("dir1/dir22")
 >>> mkDir2("dir2/dir22")

Confirm that directories' contents are really identical

 >>> ls("dir1")
 === list dir1 directory ===
 D :: dir11 :: -1
 D :: dir22 :: -1
 F :: tfile1.txt :: 10
 F :: tfile2.txt :: 1025
 F :: tfile3.txt :: 2048
 >>> ls("dir2")
 === list dir2 directory ===
 D :: dir21 :: -1
 D :: dir22 :: -1
 F :: tfile1.txt :: 10
 F :: tfile2.txt :: 1025
 F :: tfile3.txt :: 2048


And contents for inner directories

First subdirectory:

 >>> ls("dir1/dir11")
 === list dir1/dir11 directory ===
 F :: tfile11.txt :: 4000
 F :: tfile12.txt :: 222
 >>> ls("dir2/dir21")
 === list dir2/dir21 directory ===
 F :: tfile11.txt :: 4000
 F :: tfile12.txt :: 222


Second subdirectory:

 >>> ls("dir1/dir22")
 === list dir1/dir22 directory ===
 F :: tfile21.txt :: 4096
 F :: tfile22.txt :: 123
 F :: tfile23.txt :: 444
 F :: tfile24.txt :: 555
 >>> ls("dir2/dir22")
 === list dir2/dir22 directory ===
 F :: tfile21.txt :: 4096
 F :: tfile22.txt :: 123
 F :: tfile23.txt :: 444
 F :: tfile24.txt :: 555


Now test the utility.

 >>> dupfind("-o %(o)s %(dir)s" % {'o':outputf, 'dir': testdir})

Checks the results file for duplications.

 >>> cat(outputf)
 hash,size,type,ext,name,directory,modification,operation,operation_data
 ...,D,,dir1,...
 ...,D,,dir2,...


NOTE:

Inner duplication directories are excluded from the results:

 >>> outputres = file(outputf).read()
 >>> "dir1/dir11" in outputres
 False
 >>> "dir1/dir22" in outputres
 False
 >>> "dir2/dir21" in outputres
 False
 >>> "dir2/dir22" in outputres
 False


Utility accepts more than one argument as directories list:

Use previous directory structure to prove this:

Now pass to utility "dir1/dir11" and "dir2" directories:

 >>> dupfind("-o %(o)s %(dir1-11)s %(dir2)s" % {
 ... 'o':outputf,
 ... 'dir1-11': os.path.join(testdir,"dir1/dir11"),
 ... 'dir2': os.path.join(testdir,"dir2"),})


Now check the result file for duplications.

 >>> cat(outputf)
 hash,size,type,ext,name,directory,modification,operation,operation_data
 ...,D,,dir11,.../tmp.../dir1,...
 ...,D,,dir21,.../tmp.../dir2,...


DUPMANAGE UTILITY:

dupmanage utility allows you to manage duplication files and directories of your file system with csv data file.

Utility use csv-formatted data-file to process duplication items. Data file must contain the following columns:

 * type
 * name
 * directory
 * operation
 * operation_data

Utility supports 2 types of operations with duplication items:

 * deleting ("D")
 * symlinking ("L") only for UNIX-like systems

operation_data is only used for symlinking operation and must contain the path to symlinking sorce item.
Show how utility manages duplications:

To show - use previous directory structure and also add several duplications:

Create a file in the root directory and the same file in another catalog.

 >>> createFile('tfile03.txt', "D"*100)
 >>> mkd("dir3")
 >>> createFile('tfile03.txt', "D"*100, "dir3")


Look into directories contents:

 >>> ls()
 === list directory ===
 D :: dir1 :: ...
 D :: dir2 :: ...
 D :: dir3 :: ...
 F :: tfile03.txt :: 100

 >>> ls("dir3")
 === list dir3 directory ===
 F :: tfile03.txt :: 100


We already know the previous duplications, so now we create csv-formatted data file to manage duplications.

 >>> manage_data = """type,name,directory,operation,operation_data
 ... F,tfile03.txt,%(testdir)s/dir3,L,%(testdir)s/tfile03.txt
 ... D,dir2,%(testdir)s,D,
 ... """ % {'testdir': testdir}
 >>> createFile('manage.csv', manage_data)


Now call the utility and check result directory content:

 >>> manage_path = os.path.join(testdir, 'manage.csv')
 >>> dupmanage("%s -v" % manage_path)
 [...
 [...]: Symlink .../tfile03.txt item to .../dir3/tfile03.txt
 [...]: Remove .../dir2 directory
 [...]: Processed 2 items


Review directory content:

 >>> ls()
 === list directory ===
 D :: dir1 :: ...
 D :: dir3 :: ...
 F :: tfile03.txt :: 100

 >>> ls("dir3")
 === list dir3 directory ===
 L :: tfile03.txt :: ...

last updated on:
January 21st, 2010, 16:33 GMT
price:
FREE!
developed by:
Andriy Mylenkyy
homepage:
python.org
license type:
GPL (GNU General Public License) 
category:
ROOT \ Desktop Environment \ File managers

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What's New in This Release:
  • Comment useless for now output_format option for dupfinder utility.
read full changelog

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